Salmon Snapshots

Usal Creek

Restoration Highlights

    • 2 fish barriers barriers removed
    • 2 miles instream habitat restored
    • 21 large woody debris structures added for instream habitat
    • 2 miles of road upgraded or decomissioned
    • 180 feet of streambank stabilized

    Restoration Organizations


    Priority Restoration Actions

    • Promote restoration projects designed to create or restore alcove, backchannel, ephemeral tributary, or seasonal pond habitats
    • Install large woody material, boulders, and other instream features to increase habitat complexity and improve pool frequency and depth

    See all National Marine Fisheries Service Recovery Plan restoration actions at

     

    References

    Restoration highlights compiled from DFW Fisheries Restoration Grant Program publicly available information; California Fish Passage Assessment Database (PAD); and Blencowe Forest Management metric summary. Metrics from 2000-2012 unless otherwise specified.

    Priority Restoration Actions are the Priority 1 Immediate Restoration Actions listed in the Final Recovery Plan for Central California Coast Coho Salmon Evolutionarily Significant Unit

     

     

     

     

    In 2012 the Redwood Forest Foundation, owners of the Usal Redwood Forest, worked with Blencowe Watershed Management to add large logs and rootwads using the accelerated recruitment approach. This allows logs to adjust position under winter flows and create natural log jams. These instream structures increase channel and habitat complexity and provide both cover and high-flow refugia for juvenile salmonids.  © Christopher Blencowe

    Before: The Redwood Forest Foundation sought to address the deficit of wood and lack of instream features in Usal Creek in their Usal Redwood Forest.  © Richard Gienger, Redwood Forest Foundation

    After: Large wood creates the desired habitat complexity. These areas had been completely devoid of pools which are essential for salmonid habitat.  © Richard Gienger, Redwood Forest Foundation 

    Large wood restoration work by Redwood Forest Foundation is reaping benefits for anadromous fish, such as these steelhead seen in Usal Creek. © Richard Gienger, Redwood Forest Foundation

    The North Fork of Usal Creek flows through the Redwood Forest Foundation’s (RFFI) Usal Forest. RFFI and Blencowe Watershed Management conducted numerous large woody debris projects in the creek that have increased salmon spawning and rearing habitat.  © Christopher Blencowe

    The crew at work putting in large woody debris in the North Fork Usal Creek. @ Christopher Blencowe

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